Gutsy Ambassador for healthy eating visits local schools

Charlie Veitch, Y10 student at St Stanislaus College Bathurst and ambassador for the Gutsy Challenge, will be visiting local primary schools in Bathurst this week and next to speak to students about healthy eating.

Charlie is one of six young ambassadors representing The Gutsy Challenge in a national awareness and fundraising campaign for gastro intestinal cancer research. He features in the fundraisers community service announcement running Australia wide across TV and radio.

For each school visit, Charlie will be assisted by St Stanislaus College’s Food & Technology teacher. They are also bringing along a life size model of the digestive system, to explain to young minds how food is processed through the body and which parts are affected by GI Cancers.

For each school visit, Charlie will be assisted by St Stanislaus College’s Food & Technology teacher. They are also bringing along a life size model of the digestive system, to explain to young minds how food is processed through the body and which parts are affected by GI Cancers.

The Gutsy Challenge encourages primary and high school students to seek sponsorship to eat two fruit and four vegetables every day for one week. As the only national healthy eating program for school students, the Gutsy Challenge encourages students to improve their eating habits and establish healthy eating from a young age.

“The Gusty Challenge is really important to me because I believe in eating healthily every day. I have a very busy life with lots of physical activity. Between school, rugby, dance, drama rehearsals and my radio show there’s no time to get sick! To do everything I love, I need to eat healthily which also helps me stay fit too. The Gutsy Challenge is a great way to encourage kids to be healthier and get them to discover some new and tasty fruit and veg”, said Charlie Veitch. 

“The Gusty Challenge is really important to me because I believe in eating healthily every day. I have a very busy life with lots of physical activity. Between school, rugby, dance, drama rehearsals and my radio show there’s no time to get sick! To do everything I love, I need to eat healthily which also helps me stay fit too. The Gutsy Challenge is a great way to encourage kids to be healthier and get them to discover some new and tasty fruit and veg”, said Charlie Veitch.

“In Australia, 1.8 million primary school aged children are either overweight or obese,” Gutsy Challenge Campaign Manager Jacinta Walpole said. “As these children grow, obesity climbs to over 50% which can lead to ongoing health problems like gastro-intestinal (GI) cancers. Lifestyle factors, such as a diet low in fibre and high in fat, as well as reduced physical activity, also increases the risk of cancers.”

GI cancers are the most common form of cancer. These are cancers in the oesophagus, stomach, liver, gall bladder, pancreas and bowel. Every day 26 Australians die from GI cancers and over 20,000 Australians are diagnosed with the disease each year.

The Gutsy Challenge is run by the GI Cancer Institute, a charity that aims to save, extend, and provide a better quality of life for people with GI cancers by funding clinical trials research.

The Gutsy Challenge runs until the end of November this year. Register today at www.gutsychallenge.com


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